Historically Katy
Markers Preserve Katy’s History

| September 1, 2017

Texas Historical Commission Markers may be installed for buildings or locations that the State of Texas has verified are significant to state history.

Texas Historical Commission Markers may be installed for buildings or locations that the State of Texas has verified are significant to state history.

Heritage-Park-marker

City of Katy Historical Markers were first installed in 2006. The markers are installed to note a property that is significant to Katy.

Romack-marker

In 1986, a committee of Katy residents identified some properties as historically significant and installed Sesquicentennial Markers.

The Katy area spans three counties, and in those counties are 860 official historical markers. These plaques or signs are installed by the local, state or national government to note a location, event or person of historic interest. Markers in Katy are sometimes confusing. Local markers simply note a location that means something to whoever installed it.

Texas Sesquicentennial (1836-1986) markers are the most common. These have a sesquicentennial flag on them and note buildings that are significant to Katy history. Local residents celebrating Texas’ 150th birthday identified some historic properties and erected the signs in 1986.

When some of those buildings were moved to create Katy Heritage Park, the Katy Heritage Society designed new City of Katy markers that replaced some sesquicentennial markers in front of the society’s properties. A city marker is also in place at the Katy Community Cemetery on Stockdick Road, which was listed as a State of Texas Historical Site in 2011.

There are three State of Texas Historical Markers. Two houses in Katy have been listed on the U.S. Department of the Interior’s National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). One of these is the Stewart House, which has a Sesquicentennial marker but no NRHP marker. The other is a private home, which does have a NRHP marker.

State and national markers require a long application and proof that the property meets strict requirements for official designation. This designation is intended to protect the location and allow building owners some advantages when it comes to maintaining the property. For example, if local code requires or prohibits something important to maintaining historical significance, the official designation may allow the owner to do it anyway. This pertains to things like roof material, railing height, stair width and other elements that owners of historic homes struggle to save.

A list of all of Katy’s historic markers may be downloaded from katyheritagesociety.com. Regardless of who placed them, all the markers highlight Katy’s great heritage.

 

Carol Adams is the author of HISTORIC KATY: An Illustrated History

 

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Category: Katy Texas History

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